After toughest month in Senate, Corker looks ahead to full agenda in final year in Washington

Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., speaks to reporters as Congress prepares to vote on the biggest reshaping of the U.S. tax code in three decades, on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, Dec. 19, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
photo Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., speaks to reporters as Congress prepares to vote on the biggest reshaping of the U.S. tax code in three decades, on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, Dec. 19, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Bob Corker says he will leave the U.S. Senate next January in a similar financial standing as when he was first elected in 2006, and he insists he isn't likely to immediately benefit much, if at all, by the federal tax overhaul he voted for last month that could benefit real estate investors like himself.

"My net worth has gone up slightly, but it is relatively in the same range as when I came into the Senate," the Tennessee Republican said last week during a wide-ranging interview with Times Free Press reporters and editors.

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