Louisiana restoring island where cleaned birds were brought during BP spill

FILE - In this Saturday, May 15, 2010 file photo, veterirnian Erica Miller, Heather Nevill, and Danene Birtell clean a brown pelican at the Fort Jackson Wildlife Rehabilitation Center at Buras, La. The bird was rescued after being being oiled in an oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico caused by the explosion of BP's Deepwater Horizon oil platform over three weeks earlier. Bids will be opened Thursday, April 23, 2020 for restoration of Rabbit Island, where hundreds of birds were released after being rescued from the BP oil spill and cleaned of the thick black gunk in 2010. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Louisiana is moving toward restoration of an island so low that high tides often drown the eggs and chicks of the pelicans and other birds that nest there.

Bids will be opened Thursday for restoration of Rabbit Island, where hundreds of birds were released after being rescued from the BP oil spill and cleaned of the thick black gunk in 2010.

Louisiana's westernmost nesting site for colonial seabirds and wading birds isn't a barrier island. Rather, it sits in a cove of Calcasieu Lake. It wasn't affected by the spill, but is "the poster child for nest inundation," said Jon J. Wiebe, project manager for the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

BP oil spill money is paying for the $27 million project, which is more than double the size of the recently