What does 'plead the Fifth' mean? Will Donald Trump do it?

FILE - Former President Donald Trump prepares to provide commentary for a boxing event on Sept. 11, 2021, in Hollywood, Fla. Donald Trump and two of his children, Donald Jr. and Ivanka Trump are due, in the coming days, to face questioning under oath in New York's civil investigation into their business practices. But will the Trumps answer? (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell, File)

NEW YORK (AP) - Former President Donald Trump is due Wednesday to face questioning under oath in New York's civil investigation into his business practices. But will he answer?

The ex-president's lawyer has indicated that he will advise Trump to stay mum and invoke the Fifth Amendment's protection against self-incrimination. It's a constitutional right that gets high-profile exposure in settings from Congress to TV crime shows, but there are nuances. Here's what it means - and doesn't - to "plead (or 'take') the Fifth."

WHAT IS 'THE FIFTH'?

The Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution establishes a number of rights related to legal proceedings, including that no one "shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself."

In the most direct sense, that means criminal defendants don't have to give damning testimony in their own cases.