Constitution stops Charles becoming Britain's 'green' king

FILE - Britain's then-Prince Charles addresses a Commonwealth Leaders' Reception, at the COP26 Summit, at the SECC in Glasgow, Scotland, Nov. 2, 2021. Now that he's monarch, King Charles III — one of Britain's most prominent environmental voices — will be have to be more careful with his words. (Stefan Rousseau/Pool Photo via AP)

LONDON (AP) — On a blustery November day last year Britain's future king stood before world leaders to deliver a rallying cry that they should "act with all despatch, and decisively” to confront a common enemy.

The clarion call — in the vast, windowless hall of a Glasgow convention center at the opening of the U.N. climate conference — concerned an issue long dear to the heart of the then-Prince Charles.

Climate change and loss of biodiversity were no different from the COVID-19 pandemic sweeping the globe, he said. “In fact, they pose an even greater existential threat, to the extent that we have to put ourselves on what might be called a war-like footing.”

He warned leaders that time was running out to reduce emissions, urging them to push through reforms that are “radically transforming our current fossil fuel-based economy to one that is genuinely renewable and sustainable.”

“We