Long history of political gestures in sports

FILE - In this Oct. 16, 1968, file photo, U.S. athletes Tommie Smith, center, and John Carlos stare downward while gesturing skyward during the playing of the Star Spangled Banner after Smith received the gold and Carlos the bronze for the 200 meter run at the Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City. Australian silver medalist Peter Norman is at left. Time will tell whether the ``hands-up'' gesture that five St. Louis Rams made during pregame introductions on Sunday, Nov. 30, 2014, will leave a lasting memory or simply go down as a come-and-go moment in the age of the 24-hour news cycle. Either way, it certainly isn't the first time high-profile athletes have used their platform to make political statements. (AP Photo/File)

The "Hands-up. Don't shoot!" gesture that five St. Louis Rams made during pregame wasn't the first time athletes have used their platform to make political statements.

A short list of some of the most famous moments:

-Tommie Smith and John Carlos: The most iconic moment of them all. American sprinters Smith and Carlos took to the medal stand at the Mexico City Olympics in 1968 and raised their gloved fists - the Black Power salute. It was a time of enormous racial tension in the United States, and the gesture was front-page news in hundreds of newspapers. The athletes were booed out of the stadium and expelled from the Olympics.

-Obama Salute: Broncos receiver Brandon Marshall started to pull a black-and-white glove out of his shirt, designed to honor Barack Obama shortly after he was elected President in 2008.