Chattanooga man teaches lip reading to hard of hearing, but technique is controversial in some circles

David Harrison teaches a lip-reading class at Chattanooga State Community College on March 2, 2015.

Differences

* In American Sign Language, communication is done through hand shapes, direction and motion of the hands, body language and facial expressions. Known as ASL, the language has grammar, sentence structure and word order that is unique to it. * Lip readers watch the movements of a speaker's mouth and face to understand what the speaker is saying. About 40 percent of the sounds in English can be read from the lips. But some words can't be read. For example, "bop," "mop" and "pop" look exactly alike when spoken. Even so, a good speech reader might be able to catch only four or five words in a 12-word sentence. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention To Learn If you are interested in lip-reading classes, contact David Harrison at 624-1669, dmharrison1@juno.com