Fewer Tennesseans have health insurance than a year ago, but most are satisfied with TennCare plans

Staff file photo by Doug StricklandOrthopedist Dr. Jad Dorizas gives a patient a viscosupplementation injection in this June photo in the offices of UT Erlanger OrthoSouth at Erlanger hospital in Chattanooga. TennCare, the state's Medicaid program, is switching vendors in hopes of getting its dysfunctional telephone help line working properly at last.

Uninsured in Tennessee

The share of adults and children in Tennessee without health insurance rose this year to the highest level since 2014. But the number of uninsured persons in the state this year is still down 27 percent from the start of the decade before the Affordable Care Act, or ObamaCare, was adopted.2018 - 6.7 percent, 451,627 persons2017 - 6.0 percent, 408,083 persons2016 - 5.6 percent, 368,792 persons2015 - 5.7 percent, 370,115 persons2014 - 7.2 percent, 472,008 persons2013 - 9.6 percent, 611,368 persons2012 — 9.2 percent, 577,813 persons2011 - 9.5 percent, 604,222 persons2010 - 9.9 percent, 618,445 persons2009 - 10 percent, 616,967 personsSource: Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research, University of Tennessee

Dividing the TennCare pie

* 36 percent on Volunteer State Health Plan administered by BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee* 33 percent on UnitedHealthcare (formerly AmeriChoice)* 22 percent on Amerigroup plans* 6 percent on TennCare selectSource: Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research, University of Tennessee* 36 percent on Volunteer State Health Plan administered by BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee* 33 percent on UnitedHealthcare (formerly AmeriChoice)* 22 percent on Amerigroup plans* 6 percent on TennCare selectSource: Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research, University of Tennessee

Tennesseans on TennCare overwhelmingly say they are satisfied with their health care coverage, but a new survey finds the number of uninsured Tennesseans rose this year to the highest level in four years as a growing share of Tennesseans say they can't afford to buy any health insurance even with the subsidies offered for low-income households under the Affordable Care Act.

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