Mines: Dragging Canoe was revered but controversial leader of Cherokees

Thumbnail / Photo courtesy of the Tennessee State Archives / A captured Cherokee war map depicts the "Enemy Mountains" to the west while identifying key strategic forts to be attacked.
photo Photo courtesy of the Tennessee State Archives / A captured Cherokee war map depicts the "Enemy Mountains" to the west while identifying key strategic forts to be attacked.

Recent announcements of grant funding for the preservation of Brown's Tavern, the oldest historical structure in Hamilton County, and the Battlefield at Wauhatchie, named for a Cherokee chief who fought alongside John Ross, Major Ridge and Tennessee's Andrew Jackson at Horseshoe Bend, have sparked a renewed interest in the region's Cherokee history. It seems appropriate to recount the history of one of the Cherokee's most revered but controversial leaders, Dragging Canoe.

During the earliest days in western North Carolina, lands today included in Tennessee, there was little conflict between the European-American settlers and the Cherokee.