As potential risks to Muslims mount, Pentagon asks civilians to stand down

Tavari Abdul Hakeem, second from left, and other Muslims rally near the Joel W. Solomon Federal building on July 13, 2015 to protest what they see as light treatment of Robert Doggart, who plotted to murder Muslims in Islamberg, N.Y.
photo Tavari Abdul Hakeem, second from left, and other Muslims rally near the Joel W. Solomon Federal building on July 13, 2015 to protest what they see as light treatment of Robert Doggart, who plotted to murder Muslims in Islamberg, N.Y.

NASHVILLE - The nation's largest Muslim civil rights and advocacy organization on Saturday called for federal officials to launch hate-crime investigations into incidents involving two mosques in Johnson City, Tenn., and Roanoke, Va.

Ibriahim Hooper, spokesman for the Council on American-Islamic Relations, said in an interview Saturday that an online arson threat against the Johnson City mosque and vandalism at the mosque in Roanoke reflect a rise in Islamophobia in some communities following the July 16 shooting rampage in Chattanooga, during which four Marines and a Navy petty officer were killed.

The