published Tuesday, August 10th, 2010

Sewage overflow swamps marina, kills 3,600 fish

Chattanooga and the Moccasin Bend Sewage Treatment Plant are facing state sanctions for the spill Thursday and Friday of more than 100,000 gallons of raw sewage.

The spill, caused by an undetected outage at the plant after a lightning strike, killed at least 3,600 fish and forced live-aboard residents at Browns Ferry Marina from their floating homes.

“We will be issuing a notice of violation,” said Dr. Richard Urban, head of the Chattanooga water pollution field office for the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation.

A first lightning strike on Thursday completely disabled the entire sewage treatment plant for about an hour and a half, then knocked it out again briefly on Friday, officials said.

Jerry Stewart, who oversees the plant for Chattanooga, said workers were so busy getting the main plant back online, they failed to notice the Tiftonia pump station also was knocked out on Thursday.

  • photo
    Staff Photo by Jake Daniels/Chattanooga Times Free Press A Marion Environmental Inc. employee skims a dead fish out of the Browns Ferry Marina on Monday afternoon. An overflowing manhole leaked sewage into the waters of the Browns Ferry Marina over the weekend. Marion Environmental Inc. was called out to the scene early Monday morning to begin cleanup, starting with fish that were killed by the spill.

With the pump station offline, about 100,000 gallons of raw sewage ran into the Browns Ferry Marina bay for 12 to 14 hours, Stewart said.

The sewage became trapped in the stagnant, bottlenecked bay, which is tucked away from the normally diluting current of the Tennessee River. Stewing in the heat, nitrites and microbes in the sewage consumed all the oxygen in the water, suffocating the fish, Urban said.

Normal water oxygen levels needed to sustain fish and other aquatic life is 5.0 milligrams per liter, but water in the marina tested on Monday morning tallied less than 1 milligrams per liter at all water depths.

“This (Monday’s measure) is almost like a septic tank,” Urban said.

The spill marks the second major environmental problem for the Moccasin Bend sewage treatment plant this year. In January, an electrical arc after a rainstorm fried circuits on a sewage substation downtown, resulting in a 130 million gallon spill into the main stem of the Tennessee River near Coolidge Park.

On Monday, Browns Ferry Marina overseer, Terry Schrimpsher, said he called the city and state offices all weekend for help, but received only recordings. In the meantime, he said, the bay and boat slips became “completely coated with an oily scum and dead fish.”

“That’s a 100 pound manhole cover,” he said pointing to site of the overflow. “The stuff pouring out it was lifting it this high,” he said, holding his fingers to measure six or eight inches.

Schrimpsher said the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency finally came to look at the situation on Sunday afternoon.

By that time, city workers had gotten the Tiftonia substation running again and the overflow stopped. But dead fish already were floating — and smelling, said David Schrimpsher, Terry Schrimpsher’s son as well as the marina mechanic who lives onboard a boat at the marina.

Early Monday morning, regulators with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation — along with city officials and a city contractor, Marion Environmental Inc. — began cleanup.

Marion workers scooped thousands of fish one-by-one from the water and sprayed a microbiological dispersant into the water to get rid of the oil sheen.

  • photo
    Staff Photo by Jake Daniels/Chattanooga Times Free Press Nic Coffelt, Willy Cooley and Bill Seavey, from left, with Marion Environmental Inc., skim away dead fish and detritus from the Browns Ferry Marina on Monday afternoon. An overflowing manhole leaked sewage into the waters of the Browns Ferry Marina over the weekend. Marion Environmental Inc. was called out to the scene early Monday morning to begin cleanup, starting with fish that were killed by the spill.

Marion supervisor William Seavey said the dispersant “eats hydrocarbons” and is a completely benign substance.

Both Stewart and Urban said their offices reported no weekend calls about the problem at the marina.

Stewart said a Moccasin Bend worker, making routine checks, found the overflow malfunction on Friday morning and got it stopped.

“We first thought it had been running only on a short time, but apparently that wasn’t the case,” Stewart said. “That (Thursday and Friday) is probably the two most intense storms we’ve had downtown in years.”

He said the he estimates Marion Environmental’s work will cost the city about $10,000.

Stewart and Chattanooga spokesman Richard Beeland said officials with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have been looking at the January spill as well the Moccasin Bend Sewage Treatment Plant’s history of combined sewer overflow problems.

The city hasn’t yet heard from EPA about the weekend mishap, Beeland said.

“But we expect to,” he added.

Continue reading by following these links to related stories:

Article: Moccasin Bend wastewater problem could take hours or days

Article: Recycling sludge stirs questions

Article: Sewers pushed to limit after heavy rainfall

about Pam Sohn...

Pam Sohn has been reporting or editing Chattanooga news for 25 years. A Walden’s Ridge native, she began her journalism career with a 10-year stint at the Anniston (Ala.) Star. She came to the Chattanooga Times Free Press in 1999 after working at the Chattanooga Times for 14 years. She has been a city editor, Sunday editor, wire editor, projects team leader and assistant lifestyle editor. As a reporter, she also has covered the police, ...

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Grizzlybear34 said...

Why does the plant not have back-up power generation? Hospitals are required to have back-up power, even grocery stores in many areas of the country have back-up power. This is the second spill for Moccasin Bend in the past year, apart from the public health concern, we are destroying our natural resources and wildlife.

August 10, 2010 at 6:58 a.m.
harrystatel said...

"Jerry Stewart, who oversees the plant for Chattanooga, said workers were so busy getting the main plant back online, they failed to notice the Tiftonia pump station also was knocked out on Thursday."

Another release of Chattanooga "Brown Trout" into the Tennessee River since January. Thanks Jerry, for your keen ability to multi-task.

Thanks also to Ron Littlefield for his complete inability to take care of the power problem. But not to fear, the Office of Education, Arts, and Cultural Affairs has $2,000,000.00 funding for another useless program, "Connect-the-Dead-Fish".

Another round of thanks to the Chattanooga City Council for staying on "top" of the sewage problem.But don't bother the City Council about it--it's dinner time before the Council meeting and they're having pork.

"Who's Smarter than a Fifth Grader?" Not this bunch!

http://tiny.cc/6yy1c

harrystatel.wordpress.com

August 10, 2010 at 7:04 a.m.
docspop said...

And the city wants to annex more property to add to the already problem they have at the treatment plant? They can't take care of what they have. Please leave us county residents alone!!! Why add more sewage? Docspop

August 10, 2010 at 7:56 a.m.
deltenney said...

GET BACK-UP POWER!! For heavens sake, are we a third-world country! Get with it and I concur this time with harrystate's comments. This is inexcusable.

August 10, 2010 at 9:57 a.m.
dao1980 said...

Inexcusable indeed! Another embarrassing incident for our "folks in charge" of functionality. Not that they care when job performance does not immediately affect a paycheck. Though, the headline reads "Sewage overflow swamps marina, kills 3,600 fish" Am I to believe that someone counted the dead fish? Or is it just common practice to make up numbers to prove a point in reporting these days...

August 10, 2010 at 10:14 a.m.
dave said...

We have money for public art but cannot afford to take care of the basics....hmmm what is wrong with this picture? Our City leaders have lost touch with with reality. I bet that if there is a pumping station that could fail and flood downtown Chattanooga with raw sewage and dead fish (and thus contaminating the public art) it already has a back up generator. But Oh we had to buy a generator...well we will have to raise taxes... Don't plan on telling anyone your complaint though...as Manny Rico says..."we don't have to listen to anybody!"

August 10, 2010 at 10:15 a.m.
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