published Tuesday, May 10th, 2011

Civil War’s home front in spotlight


by Andy Johns
Civil War re-enactors look on as Georgia state Rep. Jimmy Pruett, R-Eastman, speaks at a ceremony announcing the creation of the Appalachian Regional Commission's Civil War Home Front guide.
Staff Photo by Andy Johns/Chattanooga Times Free Press
Civil War re-enactors look on as Georgia state Rep. Jimmy Pruett, R-Eastman, speaks at a ceremony announcing the creation of the Appalachian Regional Commission's Civil War Home Front guide. Staff Photo by Andy Johns/Chattanooga Times Free Press
ON THE WEB

The guide is available at visitappalachia.com or in the spring issue of American Heritage magazine.

CHICKAMAUGA, Ga. — When people think of the Civil War, they often think of cannons, muskets and cavalry attacks.

Some regional officials are trying to tell a different side of the country’s biggest conflict.

Last week in Chickamauga, leaders with the Appalachian Regional Commission announced the debut of a “Civil War: The Home Front” map and guide.

The guide includes historic farms, restored homes, museums and other sites away from the boom of the cannon in 13 states.

“There’s going to be a whole lot of attention on the battlefields, but this is the other story,” said Earl Gohl, federal co-chairman of the commission. “We’re able to put these sites together and highlight them.”

In Northwest Georgia, the guide includes Prater’s Mill, the Tunnel Hill Heritage Center and Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park. Chattanooga’s Renaissance Park, the Spring City Depot Museum in Rhea County and Fort Harker in Stevenson, Ala., also are listed.

Greg Torre, communications director for the Georgia Department of Economic Development, said the guide will be another component used to promote historical tourism in Georgia during the war’s 150th anniversary period, which began in April.

“It’s something we’ve been planning for a while,” he said.

Torre said the Home Front guide is well done because it presents places of interest for more than just serious Civil War buffs.

“What this does is it gives everyone in the family something to do,” he said.

John Culpepper, Chickamauga city manager and president of the Georgia Civil War Commission, said he and others envision a stream of tourists visiting the area over the next few years.

“We’ve got some exciting times coming up and good economics coming with it,” Culpepper said.

Contact staff writer Andy Johns at ajohns@timesfreepress.com or call 423-757-6324.

FEATURED SITES

There are 10 Georgia sites featured on the map:

  • Tunnel Hill Heritage Center
  • Prater’s Mill
  • Cedartown Historical Museum
  • Pickett’s Mill Battlefield
  • Sautee Nacoochee Center
  • Tallulah Gorge State Park
  • Dahlonega Gold Museum
  • Shields Ethridge Heritage Farm
  • Crawford Long Museum
  • Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History
  • Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park

Source: Appalachian Regional Commission

about Andy Johns...

Andy began working at the Times Free Press in July 2008 as a general assignment reporter before focusing on Northwest Georgia and Georgia politics in May of 2009. Before coming to the Times Free Press, Andy worked for the Anniston Star, the Rome News Tribune and the Campus Carrier at Berry College, where he graduated with a communications degree in 2006. He is pursuing a master’s degree in business administration at the University of Tennessee ...

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