published Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

Chattanooga man convicted in shooting death to remain on probation

Myles Stout reads a prepared statement in this file photo.
Myles Stout reads a prepared statement in this file photo.
Photo by Tim Barber.

A Chattanooga man will remain on probation after a hearing Monday in which he showed he'd caught up on his restitution payments.

Myles Stout, 23, was convicted of reckless homicide and reckless endangerment in a September 2012 trial. He had faced second-degree murder charges in the shooting death of Myles Compton in March 2011.

Stout pointed a handgun into Compton's chest while at a friend's home. He pulled the trigger, firing a single shot that killed Compton.

Stout claimed he didn't know the gun was loaded.

After his conviction, Stout was sentenced to 12 years on probation and ordered to pay $22,000 in restitution in $150 monthly payments, a total of 12 years worth of payments.

In March he was arrested for failure to pay the restitution.

He caught up on the payments and will have to check in with the court in 90 days to ensure he is still making payments.

Contact staff writer Todd South at tsouth@timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6347. Follow him on Twitter @tsouthCTFP.

about Todd South...

Todd South covers courts, poverty, technology, military and veterans for the Times Free Press. He has worked at the paper since 2008 and previously covered crime and safety in Southeast Tennessee and North Georgia. Todd’s hometown is Dodge City, Kan. He served five years in the U.S. Marine Corps and deployed to Iraq before returning to school for his journalism degree from the University of Georgia. Todd previously worked at the Anniston (Ala.) Star. Contact ...

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