'Don't count desktops out' and more letters to the editor

'Don't count desktops out' and more letters to the editor

November 18th, 2012 in Opinion Letters

Don't count desktops out

In the past two years many people have said that the desktop has become outdated and will be replaced by laptops and tablets within the next few years. This statement could not be any less true. One of the major reasons why it will not go away soon is the economy. A desktop generally costs no more than $1,200 if you buy it with the best hardware already installed. That is a big difference from the price of laptops where they can cost at least $1,700 as to where a desktop can cost half that and have the same or better hardware capabilities.

Another reason why it is cheaper to buy a desktop is its versatility to be upgraded. With a desktop you can just buy a new piece of hardware at around $100 instead of wasting another $1,700 on a laptop or $800 on a tablet. This is because most of the time you cannot upgrade laptops or tablets with new pieces of hardware such as processors and graphic cards.

With the price and maintenance of desktops being cheaper than the mobile options, the desktop will continue to thrive.

ALAN DABALOS


Help veterans to use benefits

I encourage Tennessee employers to consider making small business investments to say "thank you" to our veterans. I encourage employers to partner with veterans to leverage education and training benefits available through the GI Bill. This also will strengthen Tennessee businesses and our overall economy.

Many of America's warriors separate or retire from the military and go to school as full-time students to learn new skills and earn degrees. However, many of our veterans already work as full-time employees in civilian jobs. Many are still serving as members of the National Guard or Reserves. For them, returning to school full-time is not an option. To reap their GI Bill benefits, they have to attend class on off-duty time or on time provided by an employer.

Many of these veterans are already "task-saturated," working hard at their jobs, raising families and supporting community programs. Most won't approach an employer to request time off to attend courses or assistance with education expenses not covered by the GI Bill. I encourage you to approach them! Look for every possible way to support their studies, beginning with financial assistance, flexible scheduling and promotion incentives. You will never find a better investment.

ANDREW W. WHITE

Lt. Col. USAF (retired)

Director, The Aerospace & Defense MBA

Knoxville


Investigative files should be private

David Petraeus was-- and is -- a gallant warrior and a great general.

If this nation has reached the point that an intelligence agency or an investigative agency is expected to prematurely divulge to Congress (or anyone else) the information in its files, we are headed toward defeat and destruction.

If the United States Congress or the American people get a lewd and lascivious thrill out of peering into the personal life of a national hero, we should hang our heads in shame.

Even if he did time his announcement to suit his convenience or that of his commander in chief -- well, so what?

JODY BAKER


Liberals want all to suffer

Until the outcome of this past national election I never realized that "liberals" had an inclination to be both masochistic and sadistic, i.e. masochistic because they obviously love to wallow in their own misery and sadistic because they want everyone else to suffer in that same misery.

WILLIS MARTIN


Track activities skew priorities

My heart is sad for the two families affected by the recent accident that occurred at the race track in Catoosa County. Two lives were changed forever by this tragedy. One man's life was taken and a young woman's life is changed forever.

I have written to the Optimist Club, Catoosa County Board of Commissioners, and East Ridge Police Department about this track. None of these entities has paid any attention. I hope the patrons, owners and charity involved in this business understand that nothing they do is more important than the tragedy that occurred there.

I simply cannot understand how the thrill of roaring motors (so loud that noise ordinances are consistently broken), the thrill of speed that is dangerous to the participants and the audience, and an accident that has taken the life of a good man are so important that this insidious business needs to survive.

Thousands of people are subjected to this menace as many as three days a week all spring, summer and fall so a few ardent race fans can have a little fun, speed off into the night squealing tires, and brag about who has the fastest, most dangerous car. Citizens, please examine your priorities!

DR. PAT TAYLOR

Ringgold, Ga.


Expectations after election

It's deja vu all over again. Now that the elections are over I can tell you what to expect.

Expect higher gas prices.

Expect more highway deaths. The higher mandated gas averages will cause more carnage on our roads due to smaller and lighter cars.

Expect stock prices to tumble.

Expect more union organization.

Expect more inflation.

Expect more conflicts in the Mideast, with greater Taliban uprisings.

Expect higher unemployment.

Expect a flood of border crossings.

Expect more crime (goes with unemployment).

Expect higher electric bills, due to EPA mandates.

Expect more abortions.

Expect more illegal drug use.

Expect lesser Medicare coverage due to billions siphoned off for ObamaCare.

Expect fewer doctor visits, as some won't take Medicare patients.

Expect doctors to charge higher prices to offset the loss of Medicare.

Expect the U.N. to be more intrusive in our lives, such as worldwide gun control.

Expect the Supreme Court to become more liberal and dismiss the Constitution.

Expect more happiness in Europe as they see Obama as one of them, with their socialist agenda.

As the old saying goes, "You ain't seen nothing yet."

GEORGE THOMPSON

Blairsville, Ga.


Petraeus broke a basic rule

My mother taught me early in life that I should not put anything in writing that I did not wish to see later on the front page of the newspaper. How could General Petraeus, in charge of America's top secrets, not know this basic rule?

MYRNA N. ODOM

Ooltewah


Many chemicals in drinking water

Just because your tap water tastes fine does not mean it is safe to drink. Recent studies show that there is a link between the ingestion of the farming pesticide Atrazine and certain types of cancer. This chemical Atrazine easily gets into the groundwater, and it stays around for a long time. It is because of this that Atrazine now contaminates over 80 percent of the country's drinking water.

Chattanooga residents get their water from the Tennessee River. By the time the mighty Tennessee has reached Chattanooga, 55 rivers have flowed into it. Considering that 44 percent of Tennessee is farmland the Tennessee River has the potential to accumulate large amounts of this pesticide and other dangerous chemicals due to farm runoff. At this point, water treatment companies are allowed to leave specified amounts of certain chemicals in your tap water.

If you are interested in what chemicals your family is drinking, you can go to www.ewg.org to see everything in your water. If what you see is concerning, a water filter or purifier could be a good worthwhile investment.

ZACK DARBY