Front-page story shows paper's bias

Front-page story shows paper's bias

LETTERS TO THE EDITORS

September 23rd, 2011 in Opinion Letters

Front-page story shows paper's bias

The masthead on the front page of the Chattanooga Times Free Press states: "To Give the News Impartially Without Fear or Favor." In my opinion, this is a misnomer. In the Sept. 22 edition's front page is an article telling about two police officers in a city 2,500 miles away who were indicted for murder and manslaughter. While this is a horrible crime, what purpose does the printing on the front page of our local paper serve?

This is another egregious example of how unfair and biased the paper is. To print this article is nothing more than an attempt to discredit our local police department, to make it seem that this is how police officers act. It is no wonder that distrust of the police department by the citizenry exists. When there is good news about our police department, it is placed in back pages in obscure sections of the paper.

To state that this type of editorial policy is fair and impartial is an oxymoron.

BEN BRYCHTA

Hixson

What else do you want from rich?

I've been reading with dismay about the popular notion of taxing the rich. Perhaps the following story will enlighten some people.

A young man who during his second year of college lost all means of support. His mother suffered a brain aneurysm and could no longer work. His dad was a blue-collar worker and could barely make ends meet.

This boy found a part-time job and made extra money by making beer runs for the fraternity.

He was graduated with a B.S and B.A. He went on to graduate school and earned a master's degree.

He had to take loans to finish. After two years of applying, he was accepted into a medical school ... more loans.

After four years of med school and eight years of residency, he finally became one of the best surgeons in his field. He earns well over $250,000 a year. He still owes over $150,000 for his loans. He pays over 50 percent in federal, state and local taxes. He contributes generously to church and civic organizations.

This young man was in school 33 years of his life.

How can anyone say, "Tax him more so that I can share his wealth"?

Imagine how you would feel if this were your son.

JOHN BUTTRAM

Hixson