Technology poses tough decisions for parents of the future

This undated microscope image provided by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine in January 2018 shows a trophectoderm biopsy, in which cells from the outer layer of an embryo that develop into the placenta and amniotic membranes are removed and can be used for genetic testing. When a couple is known to be at risk for having a child with a specific genetic disorder, the woman undergoes a procedure to remove some of her eggs. After fertilization, some cells can be plucked from the embryos and examined to identify those without carry the disease-causing abnormality. (ASRM via AP)Wedn

NEW YORK - So you want to have a baby.

Would you like a dark-haired girl with a high risk of someday getting colon cancer, but a good chance of above-average music ability?

Or would you prefer a girl with a good prospect for high SAT scores and a good shot at being athletic, but who also is likely to run an above-average risk of bipolar disorder and lupus as an adult?

How about a boy with a good shot at having musical ability and dodging asthma, but who also would be predisposed to cataracts and type 2 diabetes?

Confused? You're just getting started. There are dozens more choices for which of your embryos should be placed in the womb to become your child.

That's the future a biomedical ethics expert envisions for 20 to 40 years from now - soon enough that today's children may face it when they start their own families.

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