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EDITOR'S NOTE: The Times Free Press is continuing a series of stories from readers about life experiences they attribute to divine intervention. We'll publish another each week as your stories continue to arrive. If you have a God Thing to share, email Life@timesfreepress.com, or mail to Life Department, Chattanooga Times Free Press, 400 E. 11th St., Chattanooga, TN 37403.

This week, Merrillyn Seib describes her late husband's path through his final days of life.

2018 had not been a good year for my husband, Bob Seib. In February we received word that his oldest son, Robert, had been found dead in Florida. This was the sixth child who had died. We made a quick trip to Florida in March to help clean out his apartment.

On April 3 of that year, Bob was admitted to the hospital with problems resulting from diabetes. He spent two weeks in the hospital and was discharged to rehab. Ten days later, he was readmitted to the hospital.

On May 3, I wrote this email to the prayer chain at church:

"Five days ago, we were thinking Bob was in a scary situation with his health. After spending 24 hours in the emergency room, he was moved to a room. He didn't seem to be responding to treatment. Two days ago, we saw a dramatic change in him.

"He had talked to his daughter in Pennsylvania and told her of his trust and faith in the Lord. He told her he believed that in life you have a path to take. Sometimes the path is smooth, sometimes it is stony, and sometimes there are rocks in the path you have to climb over. But if you trust in God, you'll make it.

"Within an hour, he began joking with the hospital staff. They took him to get an upper GI [gastrointestinal X-ray] to find out where he was bleeding. The test showed the bleeding had stopped.

"Praise the Lord!"

He was able to be discharged a few days later. For two weeks he was able to lead a normal life, working jigsaw puzzles, cooking bean soup, going to church. Then on May 21 he was rushed to the ER and the next morning took his journey to the end of the path.

— Merrillyn Seib

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