Class Notes: Lee University's symphonic band tours South Korea, and more education news

Class Notes: Lee University's symphonic band tours South Korea, and more education news

June 17th, 2019 by Meghan Mangrum in Local Regional News

Lee University's symphonic band performs at The Holy Spirit Church in Seoul, South Korea. The performance was one of several at half a dozen churches in South Korea during the band's 14-day tour to the country in June 2019. Photo courtesy of Lee University. Contributed Photo/Times Free Press

Photo by Contributed Photo /Times Free Press.

Photo by Contributed Photo /Times Free Press.

Lee University's symphonic band tours South Korea

Thirty-five members of Lee University's symphonic band and its conductor, Mark Bailey, professor of music, recently returned from a 14-day tour in South Korea.

"This was truly a once in a lifetime trip for the students in the Lee University Symphonic Band," Bailey said in a statement. "This band is the first Lee University church ministry group to visit South Korea in many years. I am more convinced than ever that music, particularly instrumental music, is an incredibly powerful means of ministry across cultures."

The students explored South Korean landmarks, attended a professional baseball game at Munhak Baseball Stadium, toured the ancient Gyeongbokgung Palace and led worship at multiple host churches.

The Symphonic Band was able to minister at five of the leading churches in Seoul and also performed at the Yongsan International School of Seoul and the Westminster Interdenominational Seminary.

"This trip was amazing!" said Emily Deinken, junior music education major, in a statement. "Not only were we fully immersed in the Korean culture, but I also feel like I got to grow closer to the people in Symphonic Band. I feel like we made an impact in every church we visited."

Chattanooga State to host girls basketball day camp in July

Girls in grades third through eighth will have the chance to polish their basketball skills at Lady Tiger Basketball Camps starting July 22.

The week-long camp is divided into two 4-hour sessions. Grades 3-5 will meet from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and grades 6-8 will meet from 1-5 p.m. The camp fee is $50 per child.

"This is the best time of the year to focus on the fundamentals of the game. Campers will learn skills through individual stations, position development, and offensive/defensive strategies as they participate in one-on-one to five-on-five games," said Lady Tiger Head Coach Stacey Franklin, in a statement.

The deadline to register is July 17. For more information, visit: www.chattanoogastate.edu/girlsbasketballcamp.

Art exhibit explores early childhood education needs

The City of Chattanooga's Office of Early Learning and Chattanooga Basics have partnered to showcase the needs of early childhood providers and parents of young children in Chattanooga through a photography series.

The traveling art exhibit, PhotoVoice, allows participants to photograph, interpret and present images that represent their community's needs and solutions in response to research questions. The purpose of this research study is to tap into the voice of the community to understand the challenges and opportunities experienced by early childhood providers and parents of young children in Chattanooga, according to a news release.

The PhotoVoice exhibit is sponsored by the city of Chattanooga, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee Community Trust, and the United Way of Greater Chattanooga.

The exhibit is located on the second floor of the Chattanooga Public Library downtown until Friday, July 12.

Tennessee Promise students can earn service hours at state parks

Tennessee State Parks are offering volunteer events at 54 of the state's 56 parks for Tennessee Promise scholars to fulfill their community service hours with many events on Saturday, June 22.

"This is an excellent opportunity for Tennessee Promise students to meet their requirements and be a part of the outdoors at the same time," said Jim Bryson, deputy commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, in a statement. "Tennessee Promise is giving students a great chance to further their education, and we're glad Tennessee State Parks can be a part of that."

Tennessee Promise Saturday includes a variety of work projects at the parks, including landscaping, invasive plant removal, litter pickup, trail maintenance and more. Participants should wear appropriate clothing for the work and bring items such as water, snacks and sunscreen. Students should check with each individual park on the activities planned and details on what they will need to do and bring.

For more information visit: tnstateparks.com/about/special-events/tn-promise-saturday.

If you have news about local schools you'd like included in Class Notes, email Meghan Mangrum at mmangrum@timesfreepress.com.